Selenium

What is selenium?

Selenium is an important trace element that plays a crucial part in preventing oxidative stress. Its name comes from its silvery-grey colour and the Greek goddess of the moon, Selene. As the body cannot make selenium itself, we have to consume sufficient quantities of it in our food. But not everyone has the time to eat a balanced diet. If that leads to a deficiency of selenium, free radicals can destroy skin cells unhindered. Here you will find out how you can meet your selenium needs – with foods that contain selenium and nutritional supplements from #INNERBEAUTY.

WHAT IS THE FUNCTION OF SELENIUM IN THE BODY?

 

Selenium is an important trace element that plays a crucial part in preventing oxidative stress. Its name comes from its silvery-grey colour and the Greek goddess of the moon, Selene. As the body cannot make selenium itself, we have to consume sufficient quantities of it in our food. But not everyone has the time to eat a balanced diet. If that leads to a deficiency of selenium, free radicals can destroy skin cells unhindered. Here you will find out how you can meet your selenium needs – with foods that contain selenium and nutritional supplements from #INNERBEAUTY.

WHAT HAPPENS IF YOU HAVE A SELENIUM DEFICIENCY?

 

If you are unable to get enough selenium from your food, you will frequently have symptoms of a deficiency. These include, for example, weak nails, brittle hair and hair loss. Those affected often suffer from a weakened immune system and problems with thyroid function. A deficiency of selenium can also trigger oxidative stress. Pregnant and breastfeeding women are particularly susceptible to a deficiency in this important trace element, as are vegetarians and vegans, as selenium occurs primarily in animal products.

How do I meet my selenium needs?

 

To keep your skin beautiful, your body healthy and your nails and hair strong, you need selenium and other antioxidants. With a balanced diet, you can already do a lot to meet your daily needs. The German Nutrition Society recommends a selenium intake of 60 to 70 micrograms per day. Numerous types of food are rich in selenium – such as calf’s liver, lamb, eggs, tuna, Brazil nuts, rice, mushrooms, white cabbage and broccoli.

If you have a selenium deficiency, you can also supply your body with it through a nutritional supplement. Selenium is available as a tablet, capsule or drink. In combination with other antioxidants such as L-cysteine or the coenzyme Q10, you can support your body’s own system for defending itself against free radicals.